Wednesday, June 24, 2009

New Testament Bibliographies

The following is a collection links to sizable bibliographies for (primarily) NT studies. I've ranked them according to usefulness. I find Denver's most concise and helpful. [See also List of Free Resources].

NT Exegesis Bibliography published (2009) by Denver Seminary (Klein, Blomberg, Hecht)
[See also Denver's OT Bibliography]


New Testament Bibliography from Vanderbilt Divinity Library (2003)


Dissertation Bibliography by Rodney Decker (He wrote on Greek Aspect in Mark)

New Testament Theology Bibliography by Rodney Decker (Updated 2009)

Working Bibliography for ANRW by Rodney Decker (and others)


Socio-Rhetorical Interp. Bibliography by Robbins and Charnon

2 comments:

pascale said...

I thought you might be interested in learning about OUR Jewish traditions which embrace the real Christ. We are the Frankist Association of America. One of our members has a new book out:

http://www.amazon.com/Real-Messiah-Throne-Origins-Christianity/dp/1906787123/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1245892844&sr=8-1

These are our teachings passed on through generations. If you can't afford the book you can see the website of one of our teachers - http://www.stephanhuller.blogspot.com.

Shalom

Beth El Jacob Frank

Josh said...

Pascale, your traditions are interesting, no doubt. Thanks for your comment.

I took a look at Mr. Huller's blog and read the post entitled "Judas and John 4:22." It would help tremendously if he would use more paragraphs. The flow of his argument is hard to follow (and in my opinion, does not flow logically).

He complains about NT scholars: "By the words themselves, I mean changing the tense of the verbs, ignoring the syntax so as to change the meaning of particles, leaving out or adding words in a way that changes the meaning, and ignoring the natural meaning of terms as used at the time of writing of the sections of Scripture."

The problem is, he makes assertions about such matters without citation. For example, he says about the 'oti' in verse 22: "In a sentence of this structure it means 'end of point one, now for point two.' " Does he have lexical information which supports this? A concordance of usages in which this is true? Exactly what is 'this structure'? Perhaps a page number in a reputable Grammar?

I'm worried that he has derived some major theological points from his reading of the Scriptures (or simply inherited such points from his 'traditions') and allowed that theological framework to color his exegesis.